Ketogenic diet safety pub med

By | January 28, 2021

ketogenic diet safety pub med

The treatment of obesity and cardiovascular diseases is one of the most difficult and important challenges nowadays. Weight loss is frequently offered as a therapy and is aimed at improving some of the components of the metabolic syndrome. Results regarding the impact of such diets on cardiovascular risk factors are controversial, both in animals and humans, but some improvements notably in obesity and type 2 diabetes have been described. Unfortunately, these effects seem to be limited in time. Moreover, these diets are not totally safe and can be associated with some adverse events. Notably, in rodents, development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD and insulin resistance have been described. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of ketogenic diets on different cardiovascular risk factors in both animals and humans based on available evidence. As a consequence of the rising obesity prevalence in industrialized countries, the incidence of cardiovascular diseases also increases [ 1 ]. Obesity is also a major risk factor for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes [ 2 ]. This state of insulin resistance is frequently associated with ectopic lipid accumulation, notably in the liver and skeletal muscle. This can lead to the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD, which is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease [ 3, 4 ].

Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions and is a strong risk factor for a number of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and also certain types of cancers. Despite the constant recommendations of health care organizations regarding the importance of weight control, this goal often fails. Genetic predisposition in combination with inactive lifestyles and high caloric intake leads to excessive weight gain. Even though there may be agreement about the concept that lifestyle changes affecting dietary habits and physical activity are essential to promote weight loss and weight control, the ideal amount and type of exercise and also the ideal diet are still under debate. For many years, nutritional intervention studies have been focused on reducing dietary fat with little positive results over the long-term. One of the most studied strategies in the recent years for weight loss is the ketogenic diet. Many studies have shown that this kind of nutritional approach has a solid physiological and biochemical basis and is able to induce effective weight loss along with improvement in several cardiovascular risk parameters. This review discusses the physiological basis of ketogenic diets and the rationale for their use in obesity, discussing the strengths and the weaknesses of these diets together with cautions that should be used in obese patients. Obesity is a rapidly growing epidemic worldwide [ 1 ] that has nearly doubled since For family physicians, obesity is one of the most challenging problems confronted in daily practice and despite the efforts of both patients and physicians, this disorder is increasing in prevalence. Obesity is one of the principle risk factors for cardiovascular disease and along with dyslipidaemia, hypertension and diabetes contributes to the metabolic syndrome [ 3 ]. Many strategies have been proposed for reducing energy intake diets, drugs, and bariatric surgery [ 4 ] and for increasing energy output exercise and non-exercise movement [ 5 ], but even though there may exist a general agreement about the fundamental conceptual basis—changing energy intake and physical activity levels— how to achieve these goals is less clear.

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The prevalence of obesity has been rapidly rising over the few decades globally and in India. Obesity also predisposes individuals to type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease apart from osteoarthritis, sleep apnoea and even some forms of cancer 1. Obese individuals are also prone to psychological issues such as low self-esteem and depression. Medical intervention to manage obesity is very few, and most of them only work with a robust lifestyle intervention programme. This leads to frustration among individuals with obesity, leading them to resort to extreme dietary interventions to obtain quick weight loss. One such extreme dietary intervention which has gained popularity in recent years is the ketogenic diet. Standard ketogenic diet SKD : This is a very low-carbohydrate with moderate-protein and high-fat diet. It typically contains 70 per cent fat, 20 per cent protein and only 10 per cent carbohydrates. Cyclical ketogenic diet CKD : This diet involves periods of higher-carbohydrates in between the ketogenic diet cycles, for example, five ketogenic days followed by two high-carbohydrate days as a cycle.

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