Healthy diet for borderline diabetes

By | August 12, 2020

healthy diet for borderline diabetes

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here’s help getting started, from meal planning to counting carbohydrates. A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that’s naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy-eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar glucose, manage your weight and control heart disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat extra calories and fat, your body creates an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn’t kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a high blood glucose level hyperglycemia that, if persistent, may lead to long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage.

Our dietitian explains the best changes to make to avoid developing type 2 diabetes. The diagnosis of pre-diabetes should set off alarm bells. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Dietitian Julia Zumpano, RD, LD, says making lifestyle changes can actually prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. The goal is to reduce your carbohydrate intake by choosing more complex carbs and exercising to burn them off. Here she explains what foods to avoid, what to eat instead, what to enjoy only in moderation — and tips for making changes. It means eating less of them. The first rule is to cut down on simple carbohydrates like sugar, a quick-release carb.

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. A person with prediabetes has blood sugar levels that are high but not yet within the ranges of diabetes. There is still time to control the levels and prevent diabetes from developing. Worldwide, 5—10 percent of people with prediabetes develop diabetes each year, and up to 70 percent of people with prediabetes go on to develop diabetes, according to research published in the Lancet in Taking preventive action, such as dietary changes, can reduce this risk by between 40 and 75 percent. Indeed, between 5 and 10 percent of people with prediabetes go back to normal levels each year, the study says. If a person with prediabetes knows what action to take, there is a good chance that they can prevent diabetes from developing. Results of the Diabetes Prevention Program in the United States have suggested that, in people who are overweight, each 2. They should be careful to avoid added sugars.

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